Category Archives: Winter

TBJ at AWP in Washington D.C.!

We took the show on the road to AWP (Associated Writing Programs) Conference in D.C.!  Check out our flash episodes (or flashisodes) here.

No Walls AWP

Interviews with Rio Cortez, Janice Sapigao, Joseph Legaspi, Esteban Rodriguez, Clem Heard, Dolapo Demuren live at the conference.

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Episode #121: Jade Chang, author of THE WANGS VS. THE WORLD

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Debut novelist Jade Chang is the author of The Wangs vs. the World, out on October 4th from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

She has worked as an arts and culture journalist and editor for publications like the BBCMetropolisGlamour, and The Los Angeles Times Magazine. She was recently an editor at Goodreads. Her first paying job after college was as a researcher for the J. Peterman catalog. (Yes, where Elaine worked on Seinfeld—it’s real!)

Jade is the recipient of a Sundance Arts Journalist fellowship, the AIGA/Winterhouse Design Criticism Award, and a Squaw Valley Writers Workshop scholarship. She lives in Los Angeles.

Episode #120: Of Resistance and Refusal

Episode #120: Writers and poets, Lauren Lola, Jane Wong and Tamiko Beyer share writing of resistance and refusal.

Readings mentioned in the introduction:

Teju Cole’s NY Editorial, “A Time for Refusal”

Adrienne Rich’s “XI: One night, on Monterey Bay…” from An Atlas of the Difficult World

If you’d like to submit a recording, please email Rachelle at rachelle.a.cruz[at]gmail[dot]com.

 

Episode #113: W. Todd Kaneko, author of DEAD WRESTLER ELEGIES

Episode #113! Featuring an interview with W. Todd Kaneko, author of DEAD WRESTLER ELEGIES.

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W. Todd Kaneko is not cool enough to be a rock star, not tall enough to be a professional wrestler and not virtuous enough to be a super hero. He is the author of The Dead Wrestler Elegies (Curbside Splendor, 2014). His poems, essays and stories can be seen in Bellingham Review, Los Angeles Review, Boxcar Poetry Review, Barrelhouse, The Collagist, Paper Darts, Menacing Hedge, Blackbird, The Huffington Post, Song of the Owashtanong: Grand Rapids Poetry in the 21st Century, 99 Poems for the 99 Percent, Bring the Noise: The Best Pop Culture Essays from Barrelhouse Magazine and many other journals and anthologies.

He holds degrees from Arizona State University (MFA, Creative Writing) and the University of Washington (BA, English). A recipient of fellowships from Kundiman and the Kenyon Review Writers Workshop, his work has been nominated for Best of the Net and the Pushcart Prize. He is currently an Associate Editor for DMQ Review and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Writing at Grand Valley State University. Originally from Seattle, he now lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with the writer Caitlin Horrocks.

Episode #112: Nathaniel Osollo, author and illustrator of SHADOW PEOPLE

Episode #112! Featuring an interview with Nathaniel Osollo, author and illustrator of SHADOW PEOPLE.

Nathaniel Osollo - Image courtesy of Amaravadee Poolswasdi.

Nathaniel Osollo – Image courtesy of Amaravadee Poolswasdi.

Many years ago, on a distant star, a small boy was born. His home was one of intellectuals, artists, poets, and storytellers. The boy became schooled in the arts. Such faith he held in them that they granted him great power. With the arts he could move worlds and open minds. One day a traveller from the future appeared to the people of the star and proclaimed, “There is no future in art.” Disillusioned and distraught, the society fell apart. Creativity disappeared and was replaced by economics and politics. The boy got a real job. It was laborious and lacked creativity. He did not remember the past – no one could. But no matter how bleak, he had a future. One day the boy, now a man, was fired and everything came back to him. He remembered the arts. He is rebuilding his power and is coming to restore the creative world again.

Links mentioned on the show:

Evan Spears:
erspears.tumblr.com

Sheika Lugtu:
http://www.sheikalugtu.com/

Online store/Shadow People:
https://mkt.com/eyedraugh

2014 Favorites: Muriel Leung

It’s that time of year!  We’ve asked guests and contributors we’ve featured on The Blood-Jet Writing Hour in 2014 to share with us their favorite books, literary magazines, and reading series from the year.

This post features poet and editor, Muriel Leung, poet and TBJ Contributor.  She writes:

“Four Chapbooks to Read by Four Badass Women Poets”

What are my favorite books that I have read this year? I have had Oprah-sized fantasies about being asked this question, and though I can promise no one in any audience anywhere their own personal copies of each book (or copper tea sets or computer tablets), I am elated to brag on behalf of the following below. These are chapbooks published by small presses—some are e-books, some hand-stitched—by amazing women poets. This year, I vote we give women’s poetry collections produced through small presses their due appreciation and recognize chapbooks for the artistry that go into making them. To boot, I want to make suggestions, in honor of the holiday season, of favorite food, drink, and music items to pair with each book—what else is reading if not an all-senses-on-deck experience? Enjoy!

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1. Was there once a leash that led to nothing other than my affection and around a rectangular pond we strolled in such fabrics as are assembled by people? No. There was just a hole. Hello in there. What time?

– from Danielle Pafunda, When You Left Me in the Rutted Terrain of Our Love at the Border, Which I Could Not Cross Remaining a Citizen of This Corrupt Land (Birds of Lace, 2014)

Pafunda’s chapbook possesses probably my favorite title of all time as it exquisitely portrays the repeated failures to reach out to a lover across obstacles that seem at once colloquial and fantastical and are nevertheless, relentless and devastating. Predominantly written in prose poem form, Pafunda approaches the form like a box, filling it with every object possible, teasing that boundary between emotional sufficiency and excess. The book is thrilling, sensationally intimate, and incredibly relevant to the fissures that have come to define the trouble of how we love and connect with each other in modern times.

Published through Birds of Lace, the feminist press is also known for its gorgeous broadsides and chapbook bundle offers. You can shop for Pafunda’s book as well as others here.

How to best enjoy this chapbook: Bake a five-layered funfetti cake with this suggested recipe. When you cut into it, a rabbit will pop out. Do not eat the rabbit. Eat around it. Put on Hole’s “Use Once and Destroy.” Make a White Russian—sometimes drink only the vodka; sometimes drink only the milk.

2. Let me tell you this secret                  all of my eyes had lived before me after 

me all of

These eyes had lived

– from Metta Sáma After “Sleeping to Dream”/After After (Nous-zōt Press, 2014)

Begin at either cover and read until the end. Turn the book over and read another collection entirely. I love a book that toys with the idea of how we traditionally read and Sáma’s chapbook takes the idea of what she calls the “reverse ekphrastics” to lyrically stunning new heights. In After After, Sáma fixates on Argus Panoptes, the hundred eyed giant of Greek mythology and in After “Sleeping to Dream,” the classical takes a modern turn with contemplations on art that traverses natural, bodily, and domestic planes. The level of play operates not only linguistically but also in the handling and reading of the book—a joy in each turn.

Run by poet Marthe Reed, Nous-zōt Press also features other great titles in its online shop here.

How to best enjoy this chapbook: FKA Twigs’ “Water Me” plays while you enjoy a piece of pineapple upside down cake, sliced horizontally from the middle first. Brew some mulled wine and invite a lover over at night. If they turn bird and disappear in the day, then so be it.

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3. the box is blank

tomorrow it will be blank

and everyday after

you must fill it with words

you do

you put words in

they are your words

you are anonymous

[erase]

– from Laura Theobald, Eraser Poems (H_NGM_N Books, 2014)

With expert economy of words, Theobald can make loneliness feel so raw to the bone. Direct and deceptively simple in diction, she exercises a vocabulary of pleading, wanting, and loving in a repeated attempt to fix hold of a “you” that consistently slips away. There’s a precision to knowing too that the language tries to access but before the knowing can be exacted, erasure occurs. This is a collection I can read sitting down in under an hour but I often return to it again and again, each time learning something new not just about erasure, but its other—what keeps.

You can download Theobald’s e-chapbook as a PDF file online here.

How to best enjoy this chapbook: Find two slices of olive bread and cut a hole in each center. Cut a hole in salami. Cut a hole in tomato. Cut a hole in spinach. Put them together to make a sandwich. Eat only the hole. Enjoy it while listening to Nancy Sinatra’s “Bang Bang.” Drink all the dry Riesling you want.

minkang

4. I don’t think I like the feeling of this… this mascara in my eyes

it will go away soon. we’ve got bigger things to toast.

 

I am                              the gaps between your packed buttered

teeth

 

lmfao creying but this isn’t that funny

 

            lmfao but i’m creying

 

                        lmfao oh shit im really creying

 

– from Min K. Kang, The Diary of a K-Drama Villain (dancing girl press & studio, 2014)

I laughed out loud more than once while reading Kang’s chapbook, which parodies stereotypes of Asian women while flirting with technological interfaces as sources of humor and reference. In poems like “Occult Universe,” Kang refers to Yahoo! and tarot cards to find answers to the inanity of racist inquiries like “why are Asians so smart” and “I was asked if my vagina ran sideways.” While these gestures are violent in offense, Kang’s humor diffuses the rage of these inquiries to subvert the balance of power—that we, Asian women, get to laugh at the absurdity of racist mythologies is an empowering experience that we are rarely afforded.

Kang’s chapbook is available through dancing girl press & studio’s online shop here.

How to best enjoy this chapbook: Lechón. Take the whole suckling pig with you to your next bath. Eat slowly with your hands. Don’t share. If this is your first time, warm up with a Mariah Carey lip-sync to “Fantasy.” You can vogue, lapping up soap bubbles, but only if you want to.

***

Muriel Leung

Muriel Leung

Muriel Leung is a multimedia poet and former teaching artist from Queens, NY. Her poetry and essays can be found or is forthcoming in Coconut, TENDE RLOIN, Bone Bouquet, Dark Phrases, and RE/VISIONIST. She is a recipient of a Kundiman fellowship. Currently, she is a MFA candidate in poetry at Louisiana State University where she also serves as the Assistant Editor of New Delta Review.

Episode #111: MariNaomi, author and illustrator of DRAGON’S BREATH and KISS AND TELL

Episode #111! Featuring an interview with MariNaomi, author and illustrator of DRAGON’S BREATH and KISS AND TELL.

Check out MariNaomi’s comic, TURNING JAPANESE, on 2D Cloud’s website here.

A panel from TURNING JAPANESE by MariNaomi

A panel from TURNING JAPANESE by MariNaomi

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MariNaomi is the author and illustrator of the award-winning graphic memoir Kiss & Tell: A Romantic Resume, Ages 0 to 22 (Harper Perennial, 2011),Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories (2D Cloud/Uncivilized Books, 2014), the upcoming bookTurning Japanese (2D Cloud, 2015), and her self-published Estrus Comics (1998 to 2009). Her work has appeared in over fifty anthologies, including I Saw You: Comics Inspired by Real Life Missed Connections, Cheers to Muses: Contemporary Works by Asian American Women, Eisner-nominated No Straight Lines, Ignatz-winner QU33R and Action Girl Comics. Her comics and essays have been featured on The Rumpus, The Weeklings, LA Review of Books, Midnight Breakfast, Truth-out, SFBay.CA, The Comics JournalThe Bay Citizen, XOJane and more. Mari’s work on the Rumpus won a SPACE award and an honorable mention in Houghton Mifflin’s Best American Comics 2013.

MariNaomi’s artwork has been featured in such venues as the De Young Museum, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Cartoon Art Museum, San Francisco’s Asian American Museum and the Japanese American Museum in Los Angeles. In 2011, Mari toured with the literary roadshow Sister Spit. She splits her time between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

In her spare time, Mari has created and maintained the Cartoonists of Color Database and the LGBTQ Cartoonists Database.